Tendinitis and Bursitis: Repetitive Motion Injuries on the Job

Posted: May 20th, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Repetitive injury, Repetitive Stress Injury | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off

repetitive motion, Illinois workers compensation lawyerMost injuries at the workplace are not life-threatening. In fact, many are not even considered traumatic. Hundreds of thousands of workers are slowly developing long lasting injuries every day, bit by bit with repetitive motions and overuse of certain joints and muscles. Repetitive motion injuries (also called repetitive strain injuries) are one of the leading types of injuries in the workplace, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If repetitive motion injuries were eradicated completely, U.S. companies would be able to save $20 billion per year in workers’ compensation alone, let alone lost productivity and worker turnover rate. Depending on the type of employment, some workers are unable to perform a certain task or job for more than several years. $100 billion is lost due to worker turnover and lost productivity caused by repetitive motion injuries every year. If you have sustained a repetitive stress injury at your job, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney today to learn your legal options.

What Exactly Are Repetitive Motion or Repetitive Strain Injuries?

Even daily life and work can produce debilitating injuries when the same motion is performed (often incorrectly) day after day. By lifting moderate to heavy objects with poor posture or by twisting the arm in a particular fashion hundreds of times per shift, workers can develop musculoskeletal issues that may one day bring their world to a crashing halt in medical bills, frustration, and immense pain. In many cases, the injury may never fully dissipate. Common forms of repetitive motion injuries, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, include bulging discs, epicondylitis, trigger finger, tendinitis, ganglion cyst, carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, and tenosynovitis. Two of the most common forms are tendinitis and bursitis:

  • Tendinitis - Tendons attach muscle to bone and are white fibrous tissues that are inflexible compared with other tissues such as muscle. While incredibly strong, they are prone to injury when twisted or pulled, or with chronic overuse. Tendinitis is the inflammation of a tendon (usually at the insertion of the tendon at the bone), which can be incredibly painful. When the sheath of a tendon becomes inflamed, it is called tenosynovitis, according to WebMD. Wrist tenosynovitis may actually cause the compression involved with carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Bursitis - Bursae (of which there are a total of 150 in the body) are small sacs located around the body used to provide cushioning and lubrication between bones and tendons. When these sacs are overused, they become incredibly painful. Victims of bursitis often have a loss of range of motion in addition to the pain and tenderness.

Recovering From a Repetitive Motion Injury

Upon seeking medical attention, victims of repetitive motion injuries will learn that the first step to recovery is rest. Taking time off work–the cause of the injury in the first place–is a necessity for many workers. In addition to rest, a doctor may prescribe pain medication, ice, heat therapy, and massage. Surgery can help fix the problem relatively quickly and physical therapy can help prevent future injuries. Recovery is timely and expensive, which is why it is imperative that you contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney with the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288.

 

Sources:

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/repetitive_motion/repetitive_motion.htm

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/repetitive-motion-injuries


Roofing Among Most Dangerous Construction Work

Posted: May 6th, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Construction Accident, Construction Workers, Illinois Workers Compensation Attorney | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off

roofing, workers comp, Cook County workers compensation lawyerRoofing is one of the most dangerous civilian occupations in the United States. Not only are workers prone to injuries from carrying heavy loads, using dangerous equipment, and becoming fatigued from being exposed to the elements for many hours at a time, but the added risk of a fall is what makes the job truly perilous. According to the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR) Data Center, a study found that roofing actually made up one-third of fall-related fatalities within the construction sector from 1992 to 2009. This is striking, because roofers do not make up anywhere near one third of construction workers. Additionally, the study found troubling data that showed that roofers who were employed by smaller companies, as well as those roofers who were residential construction workers, Hispanic roofers, and immigrant roofers had the highest rates of fatal roofing accidents.

More Than 2,000 Roofing Fatalities From 1992 to 2009

In total, there were 20,498 occupational fatalities in the construction industry from the years 1992 to 2009, according to EHStoday.com. Statistics show that 6,591 of those were from falls, and of those, 2,163 fatalities were the result of a roofing fall. Falls, not surprisingly, account for 76 percent of roofing fatalities and roofers are three times as likely to die on the job than other construction workers. The study suggests that roofing contractors need to have written fall protection programs, as well as adequate fall training and equipment. Often, the proper equipment is not used in roofing projects. While 34 percent of the roofing deaths were from residential work, only 18 percent of all construction deaths occur on residential projects. This suggests that fall protection equipment is not used sufficiently in residential work. Likewise, the smaller the roofing crew or construction company, the more likely it is that those workers will suffer serious injury or death from a roofing fall. Two-thirds of fatal roofing falls occurred when the crew was made up of fewer than 10 employees. Finally, Hispanic workers accounted for a disproportionately large number of fatal falls. They make up 25 percent of all construction fatalities, yet made up 35 percent of fatal roofing falls.

Roofing a Short-Lived Career Due to Chronic Pain

There are other dangers aside from falling on the job while roofing a home. In a separate study, researchers found that 10 percent of roofers left their trade within one year. The younger the worker, the more severe the economic impact was, and those who left for health reasons suffered mild to severe economic implications. The reason for leaving: chronic pain and degenerative health from the physical implications of roofing. Laura Welch, M.D., the lead author of the paper, said that, “A 54-year-old worker is considered to be in his or her prime in most industries,” Dr. Welch obvserved. “They’re knowledgeable, experienced and can serve as mentors to younger workers. But construction puts extremely high demands on the body, day after day. And workers are in high-hazard environments. When you have chronic low back pain, as many of these workers do, you’re lucky to get to work every day.”

If you or a loved one have suffered any serious injuries related to employment, such as chronic pain or a fall, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney with the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288. Our attorneys can help ensure you are compensated for your losses.

 

Sources:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022437512001247

http://ehstoday.com/construction/falls-roofs-account-one-third-construction-fall-fatalities

http://ehstoday.com/health/ergonomics/msd-injuries-health-problems-roofers-early-retirement-9921


Do Not Delay; Report Your Injury When It Happens

Posted: April 22nd, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: How to File a Worker's Compensation Claim, Illinois Workers Compensation Attorney | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off

reporting, Chicago workers compensation lawyerThe “fatal four” are responsible for roughly 508 construction worker deaths annually. Falls accounted for 349 deaths in 2014, electrocutions for 74, struck by an object for 73, and being caught in between an object accounted for 12 fatalities, according to the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration. All four of these types of accidents account for thousands more injuries. But, if you are injured on the job, who do you tell? Or, do you even tell anyone? Many employers fail to even mention their work-related injuries for fear of repercussions or because they think they are protecting their employer. After all, it was not their fault, was it?

What you believe about your rights as a worker may, in fact, be entirely wrong. If you were performing your job in a reasonably careful and responsible manner, and you were operating under normal protocol, you are not liable for an injury that happened on the job; your employer is, through workers’ compensation. Workers’ compensation is funded with wages withheld from you, the employee, and you have every right to seek that compensation should you ever need it. In fact, you are potentially putting yourself in harm’s way by not immediately reporting the incident and receiving the proper medical care and financial assistance that you require.

Immediately Reporting the Injury Shows That an Injury Actually Occurred

In the State of Illinois, you have up to 45 day s from the date of the injury to provide notice to your employer. However, this does not mean that you should wait and see how the situation unfolds. It is true that often an injury will heal on its own or within a short timeframe. Many other serious injuries only grow worse with time, which can eat away at your savings and cause you to miss additional work, especially if you never received the proper medical care in the first place. By immediately reporting the incident, your employer or your employer’s insurance provider will have a more difficult time claiming that the injury was non-existent, that it happened away from your place of work, or that you were being unduly negligent (such as intoxicated) at the time of the accident.

Get Medical Help Quickly

Seeking medical attention by a reputable doctor also helps strengthen your case that the injury was in fact substantial. Early medical intervention will also greatly speed up your recovery process and help mitigate future medical complications that go along with a severe injury, such as chronic aches, pains, and loss of range of motion. Recovering from a bad injury is difficult enough, as is receiving the amount of workers’ compensation that you deserve, even if everything goes in your favor and you report the incident in a timely manner. Employers and insurance providers may drag their feet, deny you compensation, or offer an unrealistic amount without the help of an experienced workers’ compensation attorney at your side.

Pursuing the workers’ compensation benefits you are due is a process that you do not want to encounter alone. If you were injured on the job, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney atthe Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288.

 

Sources:

https://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html

http://www.iwcc.il.gov/act.pdf