"AMERICA, HOME OF THE FREE, BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE" OFFERING FREE CONSULTATIONS 630-574-2288
Chat
Espanol

7 Ways to Prevent Construction Site Injuries

July 25th, 2018 at 3:44 pm

 construction site injuries, DuPage County workers compensation attorneys, construction site falls, construction site safety gear, OSHA guidelinesThe National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) states that approximately 6.5 million people work at construction sites across the country. Sadly, fatalities in this industry are far more common than they are in other industries. The good news, however, is that construction site injuries can be prevented when certain safety precautions are implemented. Consider the following seven ways employers can reduce the risk of construction site injuries:

  1. Provide Safety Training

Construction site workers must undergo a thorough training program before they begin work. They should know exactly how to handle dangerous equipment such as power tools and forklifts and properly dispose of chemicals. Understanding how to read Material Safety Data Sheets is important as well.

  1.  Invest in the Proper Equipment

Prior to visiting a job site, equipment must go through an inspection. Any equipment that has been poorly designed or is broken should be disposed. Employees should also be trained on how to properly use the equipment.

  1. Require Employees to Wear Safety Gear

Employers should encourage their employees to wear safety gear at all times. Hats, goggles, and shoes with steel toes are all examples of safety gear that may protect employees from sustaining serious injuries.

  1. Ensure a Clean Work Site

All walkways should be free of debris and employees should get into the habit of storing tools and materials when they complete a job. It is also crucial to keep waste and trash in special containers.

  1. Consider a Fall Protection System

The top cause of construction accidents are falls. Therefore, it is a wise idea to install fall protection systems to protect employees who work in construction. Fall protection systems can feature screens, canopies, nets, orr guardrail systems.

  1. Recognize Hazards and Design a Plan

Prior to beginning any construction project, the site should be inspected for unusual hazards. By taking the time to assess the risk of the site, employers can protect their employees. Once the risk assessment has been completed, preventive measures should be implemented.

  1. Follow OSHA Guidelines

Employers should educate themselves on OSHA guidelines and make sure they adhere to them to a tee. If employees notice any violations, they should report them immediately.

Contact Our DuPage County Workers’ Compensation Attorneys

If you are a construction worker who sustains an injury while on the job, you should seek experienced legal representation right away. Reach out to our DuPage County workers’ compensation attorneys to receive guidance on the claim process and ensure your rights are protected.

Source:

http://stopconstructionfalls.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Fatal-and-Nonfatal-Injuries-from-Falls-in-Construction-2013-update.pdf

Workers’ Compensation vs. Personal Injury

July 11th, 2018 at 5:26 pm

DuPage County workers compensation attorneys, personal injury claims, prove negligence, survivor benefits, workers compensationWorkers’ compensation and personal injury claims may help you recover compensation after an accident that left you injured. Since it may be unclear which type of claim is right for your particular situation, consider the following guide to help you understand how workers’ compensation and personal injury claims differ.

Fault in Causing the Accident

The issue of who is at fault in causing an accident is one of the key differences between workers’ compensation claims and personal injury claims. In a personal injury claim, you must prove the other party’s negligent actions caused the accident and injuries you have sustained.

However, in a workers’ compensation claim, you are not required to prove negligence. Since Illinois workers’ compensation is a no-fault system, you are entitled to collect workers’ compensation benefits if your accident and injury occurred while you were working. Even if you caused the accident, you may recover workers’ compensation benefits.

Types of Compensation

Compensation also differs in workers’ compensation and personal injury cases. In a personal injury claim, you may recover compensation for the following damages if you are able to prove negligence:

  • Past and future medical bills;
  • Past and future lost wages;
  • Pain and suffering;
  • Emotional distress;
  • Disability and disfigurement; and
  • Wrongful death

Damages such as pain and suffering and emotional distress, are not recoverable in Illinois workers’ compensation cases. In a workers’ compensation claim, you may recover for the following:

  • Medical Expenses: 100 percent of all medical expenses are covered without any deductibles or co-insurance payments.
  • Partial Permanent Disability (PPD): PPD is designed to compensate your injuries if you sustain a partial loss of the use of a body part.
  • Permanent Total Disability (PTD): If you are unable to work because of your injury or you lose two of the same body parts, you are entitled to PTD benefits for life.
  • Wage Loss: In the event your injury prevents you from performing your job, or you must take a lower paying position, you can collect wage loss differential benefits.
  • Vocational Training: If you are unable to return to your job because of your injury, you may receive compensation for retraining so you can receive the training you need to work in another profession.
  • Survivor Benefits: If your loved one was killed on the job, you are eligible for survivor benefits.

Contact Our DuPage County Workers’ Compensation Attorneys

If you have suffered from a workplace injury, it is important to seek highly skilled legal representation. Contact our experienced DuPage County workers’ compensation attorneys for assistance with your claim and more information on the differences between personal injury and workers’ compensation claims.

Source:

https://www2.illinois.gov/sites/iwcc/Pages/default.aspx

Social Media Evidence in Workers’ Compensation Cases

June 27th, 2018 at 7:22 pm

DuPage County workers compensation attorneys, social media evidence, workers' compensation case, workers’ compensation claim, workplace injuryMost people use social media every day. They spend time on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other social media outlets to share information about themselves and discover what is going on in the lives of their friends, family, and acquaintances.

If you get hurt at work, however, you should be careful about using social media — whatever you post has the potential to be used against you in a workers’ compensation case. 

How Social Media Can Hinder a Workers’ Comp Case

The success of a workers’ compensation claim depends on whether or not an employee sustained an injury while he or she was working. Since insurance companies and employers are in business to make money and would like to pay nothing or as little as possible for workers’ compensation claims, many will search for any way to avoid liability for a claim.

One of the ways employers and insurers avoid liability for workers’ compensation claims is by trying to find evidence that an employee misrepresented his or her alleged on the job injury. If you get hurt at work and document anything related to your injury on social media, you may be creating evidence that can be used against your claim.

For example, if you claim that your workplace injury has hurt your legs and are posting pictures of running laps at the gym with your friends, the employer or insurance company can use this as evidence to prove that your legs are fine and you do not need time away from work or reimbursement for your medical bills and lost wages.

When Can Social Media Evidence Be Used as Evidence?

It is important to note that while social media may be used as evidence in workers’ compensation cases, the court does consider all types of social media evidence. In order for social media evidence to be valid, it must be relevant to the case and authenticated. It must also address any unconfirmed information and adhere to the rule of best evidence.

Keep in mind that even though insurance adjusters and employers do not have the right to bypass privacy settings in order to look at your photos and information, they may still find content to use against you if any of your photos or posts are posted publicly by others.

Contact Our DuPage County Workers’ Compensation Attorneys

If you have suffered from a workplace injury, we encourage you to keep your social media activity at a minimum. This way, you can increase your chances of collecting the maximum compensation you may deserve. Contact our experienced DuPage County workers’ compensation attorneys for assistance with your claim.

Source:

https://www.americanbar.org/publications/youraba/2016/november-2016/how-to-get-social-media-evidence-admitted-to-court.html

Back to Top Back to Top Back to Top