Roofing Among Most Dangerous Construction Work

Posted: May 6th, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Construction Accident, Construction Workers, Illinois Workers Compensation Attorney | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off

roofing, workers comp, Cook County workers compensation lawyerRoofing is one of the most dangerous civilian occupations in the United States. Not only are workers prone to injuries from carrying heavy loads, using dangerous equipment, and becoming fatigued from being exposed to the elements for many hours at a time, but the added risk of a fall is what makes the job truly perilous. According to the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR) Data Center, a study found that roofing actually made up one-third of fall-related fatalities within the construction sector from 1992 to 2009. This is striking, because roofers do not make up anywhere near one third of construction workers. Additionally, the study found troubling data that showed that roofers who were employed by smaller companies, as well as those roofers who were residential construction workers, Hispanic roofers, and immigrant roofers had the highest rates of fatal roofing accidents.

More Than 2,000 Roofing Fatalities From 1992 to 2009

In total, there were 20,498 occupational fatalities in the construction industry from the years 1992 to 2009, according to EHStoday.com. Statistics show that 6,591 of those were from falls, and of those, 2,163 fatalities were the result of a roofing fall. Falls, not surprisingly, account for 76 percent of roofing fatalities and roofers are three times as likely to die on the job than other construction workers. The study suggests that roofing contractors need to have written fall protection programs, as well as adequate fall training and equipment. Often, the proper equipment is not used in roofing projects. While 34 percent of the roofing deaths were from residential work, only 18 percent of all construction deaths occur on residential projects. This suggests that fall protection equipment is not used sufficiently in residential work. Likewise, the smaller the roofing crew or construction company, the more likely it is that those workers will suffer serious injury or death from a roofing fall. Two-thirds of fatal roofing falls occurred when the crew was made up of fewer than 10 employees. Finally, Hispanic workers accounted for a disproportionately large number of fatal falls. They make up 25 percent of all construction fatalities, yet made up 35 percent of fatal roofing falls.

Roofing a Short-Lived Career Due to Chronic Pain

There are other dangers aside from falling on the job while roofing a home. In a separate study, researchers found that 10 percent of roofers left their trade within one year. The younger the worker, the more severe the economic impact was, and those who left for health reasons suffered mild to severe economic implications. The reason for leaving: chronic pain and degenerative health from the physical implications of roofing. Laura Welch, M.D., the lead author of the paper, said that, “A 54-year-old worker is considered to be in his or her prime in most industries,” Dr. Welch obvserved. “They’re knowledgeable, experienced and can serve as mentors to younger workers. But construction puts extremely high demands on the body, day after day. And workers are in high-hazard environments. When you have chronic low back pain, as many of these workers do, you’re lucky to get to work every day.”

If you or a loved one have suffered any serious injuries related to employment, such as chronic pain or a fall, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney with the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288. Our attorneys can help ensure you are compensated for your losses.

 

Sources:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022437512001247

http://ehstoday.com/construction/falls-roofs-account-one-third-construction-fall-fatalities

http://ehstoday.com/health/ergonomics/msd-injuries-health-problems-roofers-early-retirement-9921


5 Surprising Facts about Workers’ Compensation in Illinois

Posted: August 13th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Construction Accident, Illinois workers comp, Illinois Workers Compensation Attorney | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off

workers' compensation, benefits, Chicago Workers Compensation AttorneysThe challenges of a workplace injury extend beyond the physical recovery. Victims may not be able to return to work, and serious injuries can cause lifestyle limitations.

If you want to learn about the benefits of workers’ compensation and whether you are eligible, call a workers’ comp layer for guidance. In the meantime, here are five surprising facts about workers’ comp:

1. Part-time employees are covered.

Workers’ compensation insurance policies cover both part- and full-time employees, according to the Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission. If you are hurt on the job, your part-time or full-time status cannot prevent you from collecting benefits.

2. You can work with your own doctor.

Illinois law allows workers’ compensation recipients to work with a doctor of their choice. Also, employers have the right to request a case review from a physician of their choice.

3. You cannot lose your job while collecting workers’ compensation.

In Illinois, employers cannot fire workers while they are collecting benefits. No matter how much time it takes for you to recover, you will keep your job.

4. Workers’ comp can help you find a new job if you are unable to return to your old one.

Some workplace injuries are so serious that victims cannot return to work. Fortunately, workers’ comp benefits cover vocational training to help injured employees find a new job.

5. No industry causes more workplace injuries than construction.

According to the United States Department of Labor, construction accidents killed 4,585 workers in 2013. That is 12 fatalities per day and 88 per week. The four most common causes of construction site injuries are:

  •         Struck by Object Accidents
  •         Falls
  •         “Caught Between” Accidents
  •         Electrocutions

U.S. and state legislators have introduced several laws to keep employees safe in the workplace. The Occupational Safety & Health Administration enforces these laws. In the last four decades, efforts from OSHA and other organizations have cut workplace accident rates by 67 percent.

If you have suffered an injury at work and would like to speak with a Chicago workers’ compensation lawyer, call the Law Offices at Francis J. Discipio at 630-574-2288.


Teens More Likely to be Injured on the Job

Posted: September 17th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Construction Accident, Employer Liability, How to File a Worker's Compensation Claim, Illinois workers comp, Personal Injury, stress injury, Workers Comp, Workers Comp Benefits, Workers compensation attorney | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

 

Teen Worker InjuryAccording to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), young workers are at the highest risk of any age group to be injured or killed on the job. Workers who are under 25 years old face more than double the risk of older workers of being injured. The majority of young workers are unaware of the legal workplace rights they have.

The DOL statistics reveal that in 2012, more than 170,000 of younger workers were injured on the job and another 361 were killed. That means that a teenager is hurt on the job every nine minutes in this country.

The OSH Act of 1970 requires every employer provide workers with a safe work environment, without dangerous recognized hazards. Working teens are also covered under this law and have the same right to a safe workplace as working adults. In many incidents where teens have been hurt on the job, there was a lack of training and education on the part of the employer that contributed to the incident.

Some of the most common injuries teens receive in the workplace are caused by inadequate safety training, lack of proper supervision, unsafe equipment, dangerous work that is inappropriate and illegal for teen workers, stressful conditions and pressure to perform their work at a faster pace.

The Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) has developed a work safety program directed specifically at young workers called Teens Lead @ Work. The program focuses on peer-to peer training by teaching teens to develop the skills to teach other teens about healthy and safe workplaces. The teens are also taught about child labor laws and encouraged to reach out to all teen workers, including those who are the most vulnerable, such as undocumented and illegal teen workers.

If you or someone in your family has been injured on the job, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney to find out what civil recourse you may have for compensation for pain and loss you have suffered.