Tendinitis and Bursitis: Repetitive Motion Injuries on the Job

Posted: May 20th, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Repetitive injury, Repetitive Stress Injury | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off

repetitive motion, Illinois workers compensation lawyerMost injuries at the workplace are not life-threatening. In fact, many are not even considered traumatic. Hundreds of thousands of workers are slowly developing long lasting injuries every day, bit by bit with repetitive motions and overuse of certain joints and muscles. Repetitive motion injuries (also called repetitive strain injuries) are one of the leading types of injuries in the workplace, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If repetitive motion injuries were eradicated completely, U.S. companies would be able to save $20 billion per year in workers’ compensation alone, let alone lost productivity and worker turnover rate. Depending on the type of employment, some workers are unable to perform a certain task or job for more than several years. $100 billion is lost due to worker turnover and lost productivity caused by repetitive motion injuries every year. If you have sustained a repetitive stress injury at your job, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney today to learn your legal options.

What Exactly Are Repetitive Motion or Repetitive Strain Injuries?

Even daily life and work can produce debilitating injuries when the same motion is performed (often incorrectly) day after day. By lifting moderate to heavy objects with poor posture or by twisting the arm in a particular fashion hundreds of times per shift, workers can develop musculoskeletal issues that may one day bring their world to a crashing halt in medical bills, frustration, and immense pain. In many cases, the injury may never fully dissipate. Common forms of repetitive motion injuries, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, include bulging discs, epicondylitis, trigger finger, tendinitis, ganglion cyst, carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, and tenosynovitis. Two of the most common forms are tendinitis and bursitis:

  • Tendinitis - Tendons attach muscle to bone and are white fibrous tissues that are inflexible compared with other tissues such as muscle. While incredibly strong, they are prone to injury when twisted or pulled, or with chronic overuse. Tendinitis is the inflammation of a tendon (usually at the insertion of the tendon at the bone), which can be incredibly painful. When the sheath of a tendon becomes inflamed, it is called tenosynovitis, according to WebMD. Wrist tenosynovitis may actually cause the compression involved with carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Bursitis - Bursae (of which there are a total of 150 in the body) are small sacs located around the body used to provide cushioning and lubrication between bones and tendons. When these sacs are overused, they become incredibly painful. Victims of bursitis often have a loss of range of motion in addition to the pain and tenderness.

Recovering From a Repetitive Motion Injury

Upon seeking medical attention, victims of repetitive motion injuries will learn that the first step to recovery is rest. Taking time off work–the cause of the injury in the first place–is a necessity for many workers. In addition to rest, a doctor may prescribe pain medication, ice, heat therapy, and massage. Surgery can help fix the problem relatively quickly and physical therapy can help prevent future injuries. Recovery is timely and expensive, which is why it is imperative that you contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney with the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288.

 

Sources:

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/repetitive_motion/repetitive_motion.htm

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/repetitive-motion-injuries


Repetitive Stress Injuries: Types & Causes

Posted: March 31st, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Personal Injury, Repetitive injury, stress injury | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Bursitis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Cook County repetitive strain injury lawyer, Diffuse RSIX Dupuytren’s Contracture, injured at work, Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio, repetitive stress injury, stress injuries, work related injury, workers compensation, workers compensation attorneyInjuries can be caused by a single incident like a car crash or falling on slippery ice, or they can be caused by repeatedly straining a joint, muscle, or tendon until serious damage is done. Sometimes this repetition is done at work while trying to complete an activity necessary to complete one’s job. If you suffer a stress injury at work, you can file for worker’s compensation benefits for your pain and any time that you must take off of work.

The Medical News Today website defines repetitive stress injuries as those caused by performing the same motion over and over again.

  • Bursitis occurrs when the bursa, or the cushion between tendons, muscles, bones, and joints, is inflamed. Pain is then felt at site of inflammation;
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is when the median nerve in the carpal tunnel of the wrist area is compressed, and thus does not allow blood to flow freely to the fingers and hands. This results in pain and numbness, felt in the fingers and hands;
  • Diffuse RSI is when nothing is physically found to be wrong, yet the patient complains of pain;
  • Dupuytren’s Contracture, an uncommon hand deformity, occurs when connective tissue, located under the skin of the palm, contracts and toughens over time. It causes one or multiple fingers to bend into the palm of the hand;
  • Epicondylitis is when bone and tendon join together as a result of overuse of the muscles and tendons;
  • Ganglion occurs when fluid-filled swellings form on tops of joints or tendons in wrists, hands, and feet that appear to be firm or spongy liquid sacs, filled with “sticky, clear, thick, jelly-like fluid”;
  • Rotator Cuff Syndrome occurs when shoulder tendons and muscles become inflamed;
  • Tendonitis is when tendons becomes inflamed;
  • Tenosynovitis occurs when the inner lining of the sheath surrounding the tendon becomes inflamed;
  • Trigger finger is when a finger or thumb becomes stuck in a bent position, and the tendon sheath, along with the tendon, both becomes inflamed as well.

If you have suffered from one or more of these injuries and you believe it is due to repetitive strenuous tasks at work, contact a workers’ compensation attorney. Located in Cook County, Ill., attorneys at the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio can assist you in court today.


Compensable connection between duties found by Illinois worker

Posted: July 12th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Illinois workers comp, Repetitive injury, Workers Comp, Workers Comp Benefits, Workers compensation attorney | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off

LucyIn a recent workers’ compensation case, a woman who worked as a registrar and front desk attendant at an outpatient clinic claimed that her job caused her bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome which forced her to have surgery. Her job includes duties such as answering phones, copying records, registering patients, billing, scheduling patients, filing and checking patients in and out. She claimed that 80 to 90 percent of her time was spent inputting information on a computer.

She was denied benefits, however, because the arbitrator said that her job duties were not continuous or repetitive, and, therefore, could not have been the cause of her ailment.

When the case was reviewed, however, the Commission found that she did, in fact, prove repetitive trauma to her hands which is compensable. In this claim, she only had to prove that her activities at work caused her condition, but were not necessarily the only or the main cause of the condition.

The claimant’s argument was backed up by credible records as well, and the doctor that treated her also stated that the job was somewhat related to the injury. After modifying work was recommended multiple times, there seemed to be no change and the Commissioner also argued that she did more with her hands at work than someone would in a normal day.

The claimant received medical expenses, permanent partial disability benefits and temporary total disability.

This case showed that in a claim of repetitive trauma, there are no requirements that the claimant has to have spent a certain amount of time on a task in order to make a repetitive trauma claim. The job also does not have to be the sole cause, only a cause.

If you have questions about repetitive injury claims or have been injured at work and would like to file a claim, contact an Illinois worker’s compensation attorney for help. Attorneys at the Law Office of Francis J Discipio in Cook County can help you with your claim today.