Work Injuries and Painkiller Addiction

Posted: April 21st, 2017 | Author: | Filed under: Workers Comp, Workers Compensation Insurance | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off

painkiller-addictionWhile it might seem strange, discussing the opioid crisis with those that have experienced a work injury, it is those that started out with a legal prescription for the pills that are often at risk for addiction. As such, workers who are injured on the job should be adequately informed of their risks. The following information can help you understand how opioid dependency happens, and how you can mitigate against it. You will also learn where to find quality legal assistance with your claim, regardless of where you are at in your treatment.

How Injured Workers Become Addicts

Numerous studies and health reports have examined the root cause behind the opioid crisis in America, which claims more than 33,000 lives per year. What they have determined is that it is not your typical drug addict issue. Instead, the problem often starts with a simple injury – a brain injury, a back strain, or knee cartilage that needs to be replaced. In other words, the drugs are legitimately needed and appropriate at the time the prescription is written.

Unfortunately, the drugs have an addictive effect. Not only do they help to eliminate pain, which can become a trap for the chronically ill or seriously injured, but they also give the taker a general sense of well-being. That can become highly addictive, especially if you have been on them for a while. In fact, the odds of addiction increase greatly if a patient has a second prescription written for opioid painkillers. As such, careful monitoring and awareness should be in place – both on the part of the physician and the injured worker.

Mitigating Your Risk of Addiction

Though there is little that can be done about the pain, those that have a prescription for opioid drugs can reduce their overall risk of addiction with a few important steps. First, one should try to avoid refills, if possible. Second, long-acting opioids have a higher risk of dependency than shorter-acting ones, so try to avoid them. Third, you should have a frank discussion with your doctor about any concerns you might have regarding opioid use and addiction.

You should also know the warning signs of addiction. For example, if you are unable to sleep without the pills, are starting to visit other doctors or seek them out, or become irritable without them, you may have a problem. Talk to your doctor as soon as possible.

Get Help Navigating Your Workers’ Compensation Claim

When you or someone you love is injured on the job, it is important to ensure you have quality legal assistance on your side. After all, you have enough to worry about. Let the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio assist you. Dedicated to your best interests and prepared to fight for you, our Chicago workers’ compensation lawyers will stand by you, every step of the way. Schedule your consultation by calling 630-574-2288 today.

 

Source:

http://www.news9.com/story/35051413/what-you-need-to-know-before-taking-opioid-painkillers

 


Returning to Work After an Injury: What Every Injured Employee Should Know

Posted: April 7th, 2017 | Author: | Filed under: OSHA Workplace Accident Regulations, Workers Compensation Insurance | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off

Illinois workers comp attorney, Illinois workers compensation lawyer, When you are injured on the job, it can be devastating on your family’s finances. This remains true, even when you are eligible for workers’ compensation. Sadly, this may encourage you to return to work sooner, and that could potentially jeopardize your health. Thankfully, there are some things you can do to mitigate the risks. The following explains how.

Return Slowly, If You Can

Although returning to work could help you recover from your injury faster, it also places you at risk for injury if you come back to full duty too soon. This is especially crucial to understand if your doctor has told you to only return part time, or on limited duty. So, if you do return to work before you are fully healed, make sure you convey any concerns you have to your employer. Discuss your limitations with them and ask for the accommodations you are entitled to receive.

Know Your Rights

Just as you have the right to only work to the level that you are capable of when you return, you have the right to also continue seeking medical treatment for your injury. Further, you can still claim workers’ compensation for the time you missed at work, and for any time that may continue to lose for doctor appointments or special therapies and/or treatments. Make sure you keep track of your hours of lost work since this will be crucial to ensuring you receive compensation.

You should also know that your employer cannot punish you for claiming workers’ compensation, or for needing time to see your doctor for treatment. If you do feel that you have been wrongfully terminated, demoted, or otherwise punished for a work injury, it is crucial that you contact an experienced attorney for guidance and assistance.

Help for Your Workers’ Compensation Claim

While you can file a workers’ compensation on your own, not seeking legal assistance could increase your risks of a claim denial. Further, those who have representation during the claims process often experience more favorable outcomes. So get the quality counsel you deserve.

At the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio, we fight to protect the best interests of our clients. We handle the legal aspects of your case, freeing you up to focus on healing and getting back to work. Whatever your situation, our Chicago workers’ compensation lawyers pursue the most favorable outcome possible. To schedule your consultation, call 630-574-2288 today.

 

Source:

http://www.wcb.ny.gov/content/main/ReturnToWork/RTW_Information_pamphlet.jsp


Tendinitis and Bursitis: Repetitive Motion Injuries on the Job

Posted: May 20th, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Repetitive injury, Repetitive Stress Injury | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off

repetitive motion, Illinois workers compensation lawyerMost injuries at the workplace are not life-threatening. In fact, many are not even considered traumatic. Hundreds of thousands of workers are slowly developing long lasting injuries every day, bit by bit with repetitive motions and overuse of certain joints and muscles. Repetitive motion injuries (also called repetitive strain injuries) are one of the leading types of injuries in the workplace, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If repetitive motion injuries were eradicated completely, U.S. companies would be able to save $20 billion per year in workers’ compensation alone, let alone lost productivity and worker turnover rate. Depending on the type of employment, some workers are unable to perform a certain task or job for more than several years. $100 billion is lost due to worker turnover and lost productivity caused by repetitive motion injuries every year. If you have sustained a repetitive stress injury at your job, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney today to learn your legal options.

What Exactly Are Repetitive Motion or Repetitive Strain Injuries?

Even daily life and work can produce debilitating injuries when the same motion is performed (often incorrectly) day after day. By lifting moderate to heavy objects with poor posture or by twisting the arm in a particular fashion hundreds of times per shift, workers can develop musculoskeletal issues that may one day bring their world to a crashing halt in medical bills, frustration, and immense pain. In many cases, the injury may never fully dissipate. Common forms of repetitive motion injuries, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, include bulging discs, epicondylitis, trigger finger, tendinitis, ganglion cyst, carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, and tenosynovitis. Two of the most common forms are tendinitis and bursitis:

  • Tendinitis - Tendons attach muscle to bone and are white fibrous tissues that are inflexible compared with other tissues such as muscle. While incredibly strong, they are prone to injury when twisted or pulled, or with chronic overuse. Tendinitis is the inflammation of a tendon (usually at the insertion of the tendon at the bone), which can be incredibly painful. When the sheath of a tendon becomes inflamed, it is called tenosynovitis, according to WebMD. Wrist tenosynovitis may actually cause the compression involved with carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Bursitis - Bursae (of which there are a total of 150 in the body) are small sacs located around the body used to provide cushioning and lubrication between bones and tendons. When these sacs are overused, they become incredibly painful. Victims of bursitis often have a loss of range of motion in addition to the pain and tenderness.

Recovering From a Repetitive Motion Injury

Upon seeking medical attention, victims of repetitive motion injuries will learn that the first step to recovery is rest. Taking time off work–the cause of the injury in the first place–is a necessity for many workers. In addition to rest, a doctor may prescribe pain medication, ice, heat therapy, and massage. Surgery can help fix the problem relatively quickly and physical therapy can help prevent future injuries. Recovery is timely and expensive, which is why it is imperative that you contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney with the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288.

 

Sources:

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/repetitive_motion/repetitive_motion.htm

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/repetitive-motion-injuries