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Tendinitis and Bursitis: Repetitive Motion Injuries on the Job

May 20th, 2016 at 10:40 am

repetitive motion, Illinois workers compensation lawyerMost injuries at the workplace are not life-threatening. In fact, many are not even considered traumatic. Hundreds of thousands of workers are slowly developing long lasting injuries every day, bit by bit with repetitive motions and overuse of certain joints and muscles. Repetitive motion injuries (also called repetitive strain injuries) are one of the leading types of injuries in the workplace, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If repetitive motion injuries were eradicated completely, U.S. companies would be able to save $20 billion per year in workers’ compensation alone, let alone lost productivity and worker turnover rate. Depending on the type of employment, some workers are unable to perform a certain task or job for more than several years. $100 billion is lost due to worker turnover and lost productivity caused by repetitive motion injuries every year. If you have sustained a repetitive stress injury at your job, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney today to learn your legal options.

What Exactly Are Repetitive Motion or Repetitive Strain Injuries?

Even daily life and work can produce debilitating injuries when the same motion is performed (often incorrectly) day after day. By lifting moderate to heavy objects with poor posture or by twisting the arm in a particular fashion hundreds of times per shift, workers can develop musculoskeletal issues that may one day bring their world to a crashing halt in medical bills, frustration, and immense pain. In many cases, the injury may never fully dissipate. Common forms of repetitive motion injuries, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, include bulging discs, epicondylitis, trigger finger, tendinitis, ganglion cyst, carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, and tenosynovitis. Two of the most common forms are tendinitis and bursitis:

  • Tendinitis - Tendons attach muscle to bone and are white fibrous tissues that are inflexible compared with other tissues such as muscle. While incredibly strong, they are prone to injury when twisted or pulled, or with chronic overuse. Tendinitis is the inflammation of a tendon (usually at the insertion of the tendon at the bone), which can be incredibly painful. When the sheath of a tendon becomes inflamed, it is called tenosynovitis, according to WebMD. Wrist tenosynovitis may actually cause the compression involved with carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Bursitis - Bursae (of which there are a total of 150 in the body) are small sacs located around the body used to provide cushioning and lubrication between bones and tendons. When these sacs are overused, they become incredibly painful. Victims of bursitis often have a loss of range of motion in addition to the pain and tenderness.

Recovering From a Repetitive Motion Injury

Upon seeking medical attention, victims of repetitive motion injuries will learn that the first step to recovery is rest. Taking time off work–the cause of the injury in the first place–is a necessity for many workers. In addition to rest, a doctor may prescribe pain medication, ice, heat therapy, and massage. Surgery can help fix the problem relatively quickly and physical therapy can help prevent future injuries. Recovery is timely and expensive, which is why it is imperative that you contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney with the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288.

 

Sources:

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/repetitive_motion/repetitive_motion.htm

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/repetitive-motion-injuries

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