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Archive for the ‘Workplace Injury’ Category

What Are The Most Common Occupational Diseases?

January 23rd, 2020 at 9:35 pm

When people think about workers’ compensation, they will often associate it with catastrophic injuries that happen on work sites. While an amputation or brain injury will likely result in a worker receiving benefits, they are also eligible if they develop an illness because of their work environment. Occupational diseases can take years to develop but can be just as devastating to a person’s health. Even when safety precautions are taken, long exposure to lead, asbestos, or other toxic chemicals will leave a lasting effect.

No matter if an injury is sudden or drawn out from years on the job, most employees are entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. It also does not matter if the illness or injury in question was the fault of the employee or the employer. If someone is hurt, and cannot work after three days, employers are required to start paying temporary disability. Illinois law requires employees to report the accident within 45 days. When it comes to an occupational disease, it must be reported as soon as the employee is made aware of their condition.

Although workers’ compensation can be received if work conditions contribute to a pre-existing condition, these are some of the most common occupational diseases caused by a work environment.

  • Asbestosis: Caused by inhaling asbestos fibers, Asbestosis, or asbestos poisoning, is a chronic condition that affects the lungs.  Although asbestos is a natural mineral, it can cause mild to severe damage to the lungs with prolonged exposure. Asbestos is strong, which is why it was often used as a building material in insulation and cement. Symptoms of asbestosis do not appear until up to 40 years after long-term exposure. The fibers create scar tissue in the lungs which can lead to shortness of breath, a constant cough, and an increased risk for lung cancer.
  • Lead Poisoning: Today, it is uncommon to find lead in building materials or consumer goods. Lead used to be a common ingredient in house paint, which endangered workers and consumers alike. If workers spend time in older buildings, they may be exposed to lead through contaminated dust or paint. Symptoms will not appear for lead poisoning until they reach a certain high level. Lead poisoning can have lasting neurological effects, pain, and fertility problems.

Contact a Cook County Workers’ Compensation Attorney

Occupational diseases can take years to show symptoms, but you still deserve compensation after the fact. If you have developed a chronic illness due to work conditions, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney. Contact us at 630-574-2288 to arrange a free consultation today.

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/96-115/diseas.html

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/asbestosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20354637

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lead-poisoning/symptoms-causes/syc-20354717

What Steps to Take After a Workplace Injury in Illinois

December 26th, 2019 at 1:17 pm

IL workplace injury lawyer, Illinois job injury attorneyWhen a person is seriously injured on their own time, the usual course of action is to get medical attention, heal, and pay for the services rendered. If a person cannot return to work after this injury, they may file short or long term disability, which will give some compensation for wages lost. When an injury happens on company time, the employee is entitled to benefits through workers’ compensation that protect a worker from financial turmoil. After a workplace injury, an employee may not know what to do or even know about their rights. This is when a workers’ compensation attorney is an injured person’s best asset.

Workers’ compensation is a government program that protects the rights of workers after getting injured or developing an injury or illness. Most Illinois employees have the right to workers’ compensation benefits, and to receive these benefits, an injury must be severe enough where an employee cannot return to work. Workers’ compensation benefits include no-cost to the employee access to health care and wage replacement for time missed. To get these benefits, however, an employee must follow these steps.

Get Medical Attention: When a person is injured severely enough to be qualified for workers’ compensation benefits, these injuries often require immediate medical assistance. For work-related injuries, employers are required by law to pay for reasonable medical treatment to either remedy the injury or get to the point where no further rehabilitation can be reached. An employee has the right to see their choice of a medical professional.

Inform the Employer: To receive benefits, an employee must inform their employer. Certain time restrictions can prevent a person from receiving full potential benefits. In Illinois, an employee has 45 days to inform their employer about a work-related injury. This can be done either in person, or in writing, but it is recommended an employee does both and document when the employer was informed.

Learn about Benefits: For injuries that prevent an employee from working for three or more days, an employer is required to report the injury to the Workers’ Compensation Commission. For any lost time at work, employers are eligible to receive modified weekly payments based on their current pay until they can return to the workforce.

Contact a Cook County Workers’ Compensation Attorney

While a worker does not need representation when filing for workers’ compensation, having an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney to explain the system will minimize issues during the process. If there is any resistance from either employers or insurance companies, an attorney will be able to stand up for the rights of the employee.

 

Source:

https://www2.illinois.gov/sites/iwcc/Documents/icpnFORM.pdf

What to Expect After a Workplace Injury

November 13th, 2019 at 9:59 am

IL workers comp attorney, Illinois work injury lawyerLarge workplace deaths in the early 1900s are what began the workers’ compensation laws we know today. Most notably, the 1909 Cherry, Illinois coal mining fire that killed 259 men and boys, which was one of the most deadly coal mining accidents in the United States. Three years later, the first workers’ compensation laws in Illinois were passed. Today, most employers are required to have workers’ compensation insurance, and it is as important as ever for employees who are injured and cannot return to work.

There are endless ways a person can get injured. Workers’ compensation is for when an injury is severe enough to prevent a person from working or carry on with a normal life. Whether permanently or temporarily disabled, workers’ compensation covers lost wages and medical bills related to the work injury. The more severe the injury, the more a person is likely to receive. It is an employee’s right to file for workers’ compensation, but it can be confusing where to start and what to expect after a workplace injury.

For life-threatening injuries, it is important to seek medical assistance right away. Otherwise, one of the first things an injured person should do is notify their employer. In Illinois, an employee has 45 days from the accident to report the injuries. The only exceptions are for radiation exposure, in which an employee has 90 days. For an occupational disease, the employee must notify the employer as soon as the condition is known.

After the injury is reported, the employer will notify their insurance company. For any injury that takes an employee out of work for three days, the employer as a month to report it to the commission. After the three day mark for being out of work due to injury, the employer must begin benefits or give a written reason why benefits are being withheld.

After a case is reported to the commission it is given a case number and it is assigned to an arbitrator. To receive future benefits, an employee will have to file a claim. This is how a person to ensure all benefits are paid out. An employee has three years to file a claim in most cases.

Contact a Chicago Workers’ Compensation Attorney

Although an attorney is not required to file a claim with the workers’ compensation commission, having the legal counsel is in your best interest if the case is disputed. An insurance company and employer will have a lawyer, so it is important to level the playing field with an experienced Cook County workers’ compensation attorney. Contact us at 630-574-2288 to arrange a free consultation today.

 

Sources:

https://www2.illinois.gov/sites/iwcc/resources/Pages/faq.aspx

https://www2.illinois.gov/sites/iwcc/Documents/handbook.pdf

 

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