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Archive for the ‘injury’ tag

Roofing Among Most Dangerous Construction Work

May 6th, 2016 at 12:05 pm

roofing, workers comp, Cook County workers compensation lawyerRoofing is one of the most dangerous civilian occupations in the United States. Not only are workers prone to injuries from carrying heavy loads, using dangerous equipment, and becoming fatigued from being exposed to the elements for many hours at a time, but the added risk of a fall is what makes the job truly perilous. According to the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR) Data Center, a study found that roofing actually made up one-third of fall-related fatalities within the construction sector from 1992 to 2009. This is striking, because roofers do not make up anywhere near one third of construction workers. Additionally, the study found troubling data that showed that roofers who were employed by smaller companies, as well as those roofers who were residential construction workers, Hispanic roofers, and immigrant roofers had the highest rates of fatal roofing accidents.

More Than 2,000 Roofing Fatalities From 1992 to 2009

In total, there were 20,498 occupational fatalities in the construction industry from the years 1992 to 2009, according to EHStoday.com. Statistics show that 6,591 of those were from falls, and of those, 2,163 fatalities were the result of a roofing fall. Falls, not surprisingly, account for 76 percent of roofing fatalities and roofers are three times as likely to die on the job than other construction workers. The study suggests that roofing contractors need to have written fall protection programs, as well as adequate fall training and equipment. Often, the proper equipment is not used in roofing projects. While 34 percent of the roofing deaths were from residential work, only 18 percent of all construction deaths occur on residential projects. This suggests that fall protection equipment is not used sufficiently in residential work. Likewise, the smaller the roofing crew or construction company, the more likely it is that those workers will suffer serious injury or death from a roofing fall. Two-thirds of fatal roofing falls occurred when the crew was made up of fewer than 10 employees. Finally, Hispanic workers accounted for a disproportionately large number of fatal falls. They make up 25 percent of all construction fatalities, yet made up 35 percent of fatal roofing falls.

Roofing a Short-Lived Career Due to Chronic Pain

There are other dangers aside from falling on the job while roofing a home. In a separate study, researchers found that 10 percent of roofers left their trade within one year. The younger the worker, the more severe the economic impact was, and those who left for health reasons suffered mild to severe economic implications. The reason for leaving: chronic pain and degenerative health from the physical implications of roofing. Laura Welch, M.D., the lead author of the paper, said that, “A 54-year-old worker is considered to be in his or her prime in most industries,” Dr. Welch obvserved. “They’re knowledgeable, experienced and can serve as mentors to younger workers. But construction puts extremely high demands on the body, day after day. And workers are in high-hazard environments. When you have chronic low back pain, as many of these workers do, you’re lucky to get to work every day.”

If you or a loved one have suffered any serious injuries related to employment, such as chronic pain or a fall, contact an experienced Chicago workers’ compensation attorney with the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today at 630-574-2288. Our attorneys can help ensure you are compensated for your losses.

 

Sources:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022437512001247

http://ehstoday.com/construction/falls-roofs-account-one-third-construction-fall-fatalities

http://ehstoday.com/health/ergonomics/msd-injuries-health-problems-roofers-early-retirement-9921

What Should I Do Following a Work-Related Injury?

June 17th, 2015 at 2:44 pm

injury, workplace injury, Illinois Workers Compensation AttorneyThe Workers’ Compensation Act governs workers’ comp procedures in the state of Illinois. Despite this legislation, many injured workers do not receive the compensation they deserve.

In part, this is because few people understand the legal framework related to workers’ compensation. Sometimes, employers do not take the necessary steps to secure compensation for their workers. If you have received unfair treatment following a work-related injury, be sure to consult an attorney who can assess your case, explain your rights, and provide actionable advice.

Am I Eligible for Workers’ Compensation Benefits?

According to the Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission, workers’ compensation insurance must cover both part- and full-time employees. In some cases, though, it is possible for a worker to jeopardize his or her ability to receive benefits after an injury. This may happen when a worker fails to report an injury immediately after the incident, or does not seek medical attention quickly.

Reporting a Workplace Injury

Some injuries happen during a sudden accident at work. Falls, heavy machinery, and projectile objects are all common sources of workplace injuries.

Other injuries, such as those from repetitive stress, are more subtle. No matter what the source of the injury, though, it is critical that the worker reports it to a manager as soon as possible. Be sure to ask your employer about his or her insurance provider, as well as the steps that you must take to receive compensation.

If you have suffered an injury at work yet did not receive compensation, contact the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio for advice. With more than two decades of experience, our firm can represent your interests and potentially recover the compensation that you deserve. To schedule a free consultation with a Chicago workers’ compensation lawyer, call us today at 630-574-2288.

Study Finds Many Undocumented Workers Stuck in Dangerous Jobs

August 6th, 2014 at 4:52 pm

undocumented workersA recent study conducted by Cornell University and Penn State University found that illegal immigrants who are working in high-risk or dangerous jobs are not paid a pay premium for working in those hazardous conditions.

The study, titled The Occupational Cost of Being Illegal in the United States: Legal Status, Job Hazards and Compensating Differentials, analyzed data from the U.S. Census’ Survey of Income and Program Participation. This survey provides information about visa and citizenship status. They also used data from Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries and the Department of Labor’s Occupational Information Network.

Not only do undocumented workers not receive a pay premium for working in dangerous conditions, but if they are injured, most are too scared to report the injury for fear they will be deported.

According to the study, one of the biggest problems is the language barrier that often exists when it comes to effective safety training. Another factor regarding undocumented workers in hazardous working environments is that many employers who hire illegal immigrants are not concerned that any safety hazards will be reported because the undocumented worker is afraid of losing their job if they do.

The research team said the evidence they found shows that undocumented workers are not employed in the most dangerous jobs – which are in mining and logging. Instead, they can be found at jobs in agriculture and construction, which can also pose serious health risks. Additionally, many undocumented workers are employed at jobs where they are exposed to dangerous chemicals or radiation, such as working in a dry cleaners or working as janitors in healthcare facilities.

Many state court decisions have ruled that an undocumented worker who is injured on the job is entitled to receive workers’ compensation benefits. If you have been injured on the job, contact an experienced Illinois workers’ compensation attorney to find out what civil recourse you may have for compensation for pain and loss you have suffered.

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