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Archive for the ‘TTD’ tag

How Long Can I Collect Workers’ Compensation Benefits?

July 16th, 2020 at 11:06 pm

IL job injury attorney, Illinois workers comp lawyerAn injury can result in pain and suffering, a heap of medical bills, and/or other damages. To help those who have suffered an injury stay afloat, the state of Illinois passed the Illinois Workers’ Compensation and Occupational Diseases Act. Due to the complexity of the bill and the nature of the injury suffered, it is important to consult with a workers’ compensation attorney.

An Overview

Workers’ compensation is a system of the state law that requires employers to pay or have insurance that pays for any injuries that result while on the job. If you have suffered a work-related injury, you are most likely covered under workers’ compensation as long as you are an employee. Those covered include:

  • Full  and part-time employees
  • Minors
  • Undocumented immigrant workers

In order to be eligible for benefits, you must establish the injury happened as a result of your employment and occurred during working hours.

Workers’ Compensation Categories

The amount of time an injured worker may collect benefits for depends on the severity of the injury. Within the Illinois Workers’ Compensation and Occupational Diseases Act, an injury can fall into one of four categories:

  1. Temporary partial disability: TPD includes those who sustained a work-related injury that only temporarily limits their ability to work.
  2. Temporary total disability: TTD pertains to cases in which a worker is disabled for a period of time, but is expected to recover and return to work. The length of compensation solely depends on the length of time away from work.
  3. Permanent partial disability: Similar to permanent total disability, permanent partial disability incorporates an extended period of benefits. However, some work must still be performed. The benefits earned may replace the ones that were previously lost, even though additional ones may be gained.
  4. Permanent total disability: Permanent total disability refers to those who are no longer able to return to work whatsoever. Indefinite benefits will provide on behalf of the inability to work.

The amount of benefits you receive can depend on your average weekly wage at the time of the injury.

Contact an Illinois Workers’ Compensation Attorney Today

If you have suffered a work-related injury, you may be eligible for compensation. Contact a Chicago workers’ compensation attorney from the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio, and allow us to calculate your eligibility and the level of benefits you deserve. Call our office at 630-574-2288 to schedule your free consultation.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=2430&ChapterID=68

Responsibilities of Your Employer If You Are Injured At Work

April 29th, 2014 at 3:16 pm

workers compensation, IWCC, Illinois Workers Compensation Commission, lawyer, attorneyAll employers in Illinois, according to the Illinois Department of Insurance, are required to carry worker’s compensation coverage for employees. If a person is hired as an independent contractor, employers are not required to carry worker’s compensation insurance, which has led to some changes in what can be considered a contract position and what cannot; several disputes have recently arisen regarding a person’s title versus his or her professional responsibilities. All worker’s compensation benefits are covered by licensed insurance companies and must, according to the Illinois Department of Insurance, be among those certified by the state. A list of those companies can be found here.

According to the Illinois Worker’s Compensation Commission (IWCC), if a person is injured at work there are several responsibilities that the employer must undertake by law. First, an employer must render appropriate and necessary first aid and medical services. Immediately after that, the employer must contact his worker’s compensation underwriter, even if he disagrees with the employee’s claim. If the employee was injured to the extent that he or she cannot work for at least three days, the employer has a responsibility to either:

  • Begin Temporary Total Disability (TTD) payments;
  • Provide the employee with a written explanation of what he needs to begin TTD payments; or
  • Provide the employee with a written explanation of he is denying the benefits.

Employers must maintain complete records of all worker’s compensation claims, and must submit any and all claims to the IWCC. If a workers dies while at work, the report must be submitted to the IWCC within two days of the incident. If a worker is injured but not incapacitated for more than three days, an employer is not responsible to submit a claim to the IWCC.

If you suspect that your employer has not met worker’s compensation responsibilities in Illinois, you may be eligible for a lawsuit against him. The most important first step is to contact a worker’s compensation attorney. Contact the Law Offices of Francis J. Discipio today.

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